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Blog Archive for editor during September 2005

java.net downtime this weekend As you've hopefully seen in the broadcast message on the front page and all project pages, java.net will be unavailable during some downtime this weekend. The site will be unavailable on Saturday 10/1 from 8 AM PDT to 8 PM PDT (1500 - 0300 UTC). We'll be looking for you on the other side of the downtime. Your editor is writing from the producer's desk at O'...
Alternatives to too-complicated web app frameworks It's day two of the java.net summit out here in Santa Clara, with the executive board / infrastructure team looking at the site, considering feedback from community leaders, and planning out our big ideas for the next year and beyond. It will be a while before you see any of this on the site, but rest assured that we're not standing still --...
The pros and cons of hibernation Your editors are on the West Coast for some java.net meetings, but we're still on East Coast time. Sleep always seems to fall by the wayside on these trips, but there's so much to do out here. If there weren't now a Fry's Electronics in Atlanta, I would probably have brought a second suitcase just to load up stuff from the Palo Alto store. I went to college...
Make your media mobile Mobile phones have a wide variety of media capabilities -- something that's both exciting and challenging to the programmer who wants to use them. It's great to potentially have MP3 playback, a capture device like a camera, or video on board. On the other hand, it's a huge hassle if you intend to deploy your MIDlet across a wide variety of devices, all with differing...
What it takes to not suck It's not often that an online screed is so brimming with ideas that each of them could support its own blog entry. It's even less often that such a diatribe has a simple and blunt a title as In Why Software Sucks. In it, Scott Berkun (author of The Art of Project Management) manages to cover: what it means for something, i.e., software, to "suck" how reactions to...
Adding arbitrary web app debug code at runtime "Debugging" can mean a lot of different things. The classic use case has a developer sitting at his or her machine, using a low-level debugger like jdb or IDE-based equivalents to inspect the state of variables, threads, objects, etc. And that's great. But there's also a sense of debugging involved in seeing a production system misbehaving and...
The idea of mutual respect Yesterday's Editor's Blog, Why Don't You Get a Job? kicked off some pretty heated responses, showing some very different perceptions of how to keep your Java career going. The crux of that blog was a report, one of several I've seen recently, saying that businesspeople want developers who are more than "just programmers", meaning they need to have business skills,...
Coding skills are no longer enough. If you thought specialization in your career meant picking J2EE, SE, or ME, get ready for a rough ride. More and more analysts are saying that it's not enough to be "just" a programmer anymore. According to the IDN article Survey: CIOs Want Devs with More Business Skills, featured in the Also in Java Today section, a survey of 90 top CIO/CTO executives...
Keep malicious code out of your web app In the first installment of his series on web app security and validating input, Stephen Enright showed some surprisingly effective attacks that could be carried out by sending SQL statements in HTML form values. But of course, the server is only one half of the security story. The browser also offers opportunities for mischief. In the Feature...
Making your mark on Mustang It can be done. Outsider contributions will be in the next version of Java, and there's still time to join in. If you don't believe it, check out the forum message JDK collaboration bug fixes, cited in today's Projects & Communities section. In it, timbell lists 39 bug fixes that have been submitted by outside contributors. Nine of them have already been...