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Blog Archive for editor during August 2005

Sanity checking simple code Jeff Friesen's BlueJ article, posted yesterday, reminds me of one of my favorite tools when I was getting started in Java. In BlueJ, this is called the "Code Pad", a simple text area where you can input some Java code and execute it immediately. This allows you to test simple things, do some sanity tests, etc., without having to write a whole class. This reminded...
Advanced features of the beginner's IDE Jeff Friesen's first article on BlueJ, an IDE aimed at students and others learning Java, kicked off a lengthy talkback discussion about the value of shielding students from Java's command-line and other low-level "pipe". One crowd said that BlueJ and IDE's like it "teach the tool" instead of teaching Java itself. Others, including the author, argued...
What does "active in java.net projects" mean anyways? The results of the current java.net poll are kind of interesting. Asked "How active are you in java.net projects?", the current results show 68% saying they're not involved in projects. That it's the highest response isn't too surprising -- coding and reporting bugs is work -- but the overall distribution is not what I expected when I...
A burst of Swing activity Usually when I pick items for the front page, I look for balance: a little enterprise here, a dash of J2ME there, mix up the patterns and the testing between the AIJT's and P&C's... that way, there's something for everyone, and a sense of Java's breadth, ubuiquity, and applicability. But the last few weblogs offered such a rare occurrance, a cosmic alignment, that I...
Simplifying AJAX client-server connections Feel free to jump on the AJAX bandwagon. Surely you've heard of AJAX by now, and if you haven't, the concept can be expressed in two words: Google Maps. Notice how when you click arrows or the map and satellite buttons that the whole page doesn't reload, and that only part of the page refreshes, and quickly? Mostly done with client-side scrpiting and...
How does your career affect your development choices? We've kicked off a new forum today, focusing on the choices you're making in your careers vis-a-vis Java. The point of the Your Java Career forum (part of The Programming Profession) is not to talk about theory, but instead about the real things you're experiencing as Java developers. This includes (but is not limited to) the kinds of tools...
Can your prototype be too good? Desktop developers usually need, as a basic requirement of their trade, to create a visual representation of their GUI before they code it. Visual prototyping lets you experiment with workflows, discover inconsistencies, and work out hard parts in advance. It is also, unfortunately, a great way to blow your schedule. The obvious problem with the pretty,...
I18N, L10N, and T9N The Java mindset usually seizes on internationalization in terms of ensuring that code behaves correctly in different locales, which means being flexible about currency and time conventions, being able to display two-byte Unicode characters, and reading and displaying localized text instead of hard coding it into the source. Which is great, but who's doing the localization?...
Take count, literally, of your Java efforts Today's java.net poll is one that won't lead to easy interpretation, but I thought it would be interesting to put out there anyways: How many lines of Java code do you think you've ever written? There are a lot of factors that will figure into each reader's answer. You can argue that Java is intrinsically verbose, so we as Java programmers tend to...
Make or break time for EJB? Why are there alternatives to Enterprise JavaBeans? With the benefit of incumbency, not to mention marketing by the creators of Java and J2EE, EJB's should be a slam dunk. Yet many developers abandoned EJB's in recent years, in favor of alternatives, most obviously Spring, but there are others. Would these frameworks exist if not as a response to, if not...