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Blog Archive for editor during July 2005

Perl? Java? Yes! Perl and Java seem like unlikely bedfellows. If you measure lines of code, I think Java gets interesting right about the point that Perl stops being manageable. As always with these generalizations, your mileage may vary. Still, that's one of the reasons we have many different languages, each with their own sweet spots of functionality. But why not have the best of both...
Wide-open feedback channels Not every feature request can be phrased as, well, a "feature request". If everything has to go through the SDN Bug Database, then it has to be condensed down to a specific report or request. Sometimes, what you know is the ultimate functionality you want, or a feel for what needs to be improved, and you as a requester shouldn't be responsible for phrasing just how...
One of Java's top detractors changes his tune? Veteran computer columnist John C. Dvorak has never held a particularly high opinion of Java. As early as 1996, he branded it a "Born Loser", and speculated in 2002 that IBM might be "toast", in part because of its embrace of Java. In 2003, he declared that "Java is OUT and Flash is IN". Not for nothing does Rodey Green's classic Java Glossary...
Overhauling your GUI's so they make sense Take off your developer hat for a minute, put on your user hat, and take a look at the really horrid user interfaces out there. You don't have to look far to find applications that are simply inept and downright painful to use. If you don't have any examples coming to mind, here are three different "user interface halls of shame" that collect the...
The process of the Java Community Process Given the adage about never wanting to see sausage or laws getting made, do you really want to know how JSR's are created? I actually think the process is interesting because if you tour the complete list of JSR's at jcp.org you can recognize JSR's that have become parts of the core language (generics, assertions) and commonly-used extensions (JSF,...
Size isn't everything Back in Java 1.0, O'Reilly's Java in a Nutshell handbook was a modest brown book, weighing in at 438 pages. The J2SE 5.0 edition is a desk-cracking 1225 pages, and it leaves out all of the desktop packages: AWT, Swing, JavaSound, etc. The book's preface notes that Java has grown from Java 1.0's 212 classes in 8 packages to J2SE 5.0's 3562 classes in 166 packages. This...
Apple offered two surprise BoF's at JavaOne - a "surprise" because they hadn't previously been announced or expected and just appeared in the addendum and corrections to the JavaOne show schedule. Still, about a hundred developers managed to find their way over to the Marriott to see the show. I got there too late to see the formal introductions on the first presentation, which was well into...
Exploring J2ME's game API Mobile device games may seem simple, but they're anything but trifling. Mobile gaming was estimated to be about a $US 3 billion market in 2004, on track to reach $US 18.5 billion by 2009. And Java is a huge part of that market, with J2ME increasingly ubiquitous on phones and well supported by game makers. The games are getting increasingly sophisticated too. Early...
Getting the word out In yesterday's blog, I made the point that a good time to make project-related announcements is pretty much any of the 51 weeks of the year that don't coincide with JavaOne, as announcements from Sun tend to drown out everyone else's announcements and releases. Today, I'd like to share another tip with you: Tell us what you're up to. We want to know. This was the theme of...
It's not all about JavaOne after all... This is why we encourage projects, particularly open-source efforts, not to make major announcements during the middle of JavaOne: Apache's Geronimo team has just announced that they've passed the TCK test suite, bringing this open-source and liberally-licensed J2EE server closer to full J2EE certification. Had this announcement come early last week, it...