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Blog Archive for duncan during June 2003

Sometime yesterday (ok, really the day before that now) Ken Arnold started in on his Hack. You see, at MacHack, the highlight event is on Friday night where people present the stuff they've been working on through the conference. If it's a proper hack—something cool, yet useless—you get wild applause from the crowd. If not, well, tirades such as "marketing!" and "...
I just ran into Ken Arnold at MacHack (he's giving the keynote tonight at midnight) and after chatting a bit, we picked back up the Ant conversation we were having at JavaOne. He's obviously been thinking about it for a while because he came out with the line: The problem with Ant is that it violates something we learned with Unix. Tasks aren't composable. And you know, he's right. Ant uses...
Now that JavaOne and the Wisconsin Software Symposium are done, I've headed further east and am in Cleveland Ohio. I've stopped here for a few days to visit friends and get ready for the upcoming MacHack in Detroit. While here in Cleveland, Maciej Zawadzki (of UrbanCode) and Dan Steinberg (Editor-in-Chief of Java.net) asked me to speak at the Cleveland Java User Group tonight. I'll be...
The front page for Java.net has been down for a while today. The good news is that only the front page is down. Apparently, the infrastructure for the Java.net gaggle of servers is spread around a bit. CollabNet hosts and controls part of the infrastructure, some other machines are hosted by CollabNet but are under O'Reilly control, and then there's a machine hosted and controlled by Sun which...
After a fun week in San Francisco for JavaOne, there's a group of us, including fellow Java.net bloggers Jason Hunter, Glenn Vanderburg, and Mike Clark are heading on to the next Java conference on the schedule: The Wisconsin Java Software Symposium, part of the No Fluff Just Stuff conference series. It'll be interesting to make the shift from the big conference where there's lots of people that...
One of the surprising things about JavaOne for me this year is the amount of talk about Ant. Not the normal "Ant is cool" buzz that I hear (and which still amazes me), but a different kind of talk. There's talk of experimentation and trying out new things. And it all seems to be focusing on how to alleviate the burden that the decision to use XML as the Ant configuration format has...
One of the interesting things for me about the Java.net experiment so far has been checking out the reactions from the blogosphere that I navigate through every day. Ted Leung posts: "A shared CVS repository, wiki's and a bunch of weblogs do not a community make. Sun might be able to get bunches of communities around individual projects, but growing a community across projects takes time...
Mike Cannon-Brookes says that Java.net wasn't really launched today because it's not linked in from java.sun.com. Well, even though Java.net was launched today (albeit with no mention of the weblogs section of the site at the keynote), Mike does make the excellent observation that there isn't a link from java.sun.com to Java.net. Which is very odd indeed. And looking a bit deeper, it appears...
Matt Raible (whose blog I read) has a few questions about the Java.net blogs. Here are some answers: Is the content moderated? Nope. At least not under normal circumstances. If one of us said something libelous, then moderation would probably kick in. But until we hit that point, we should be free from moderation. Daniel Steinberg, the Editor-in-Chief of the site, wants to take a very hands...
The morning keynote is done and over with. There wasn't a lot there that stuck with me, but then, it's the non-technical keynote. So what did stick? Two things. One was the best line of the keynote when Jonathan Schwartz said, "The lawyers work for me." Man, I hope that's really true and not a joke. One of the biggest complaints I hear about Sun is that it seems that the lawyers are in...