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Blog Archive for driscoll during May 2009

I'm not sure how I got this job, but apparently I'm supposed to find all the JavaOne parties. This year was harder, and it seems there will be very few opportunities to cage free drinks from eager PR people. Oh well, I intended to go to a lot of BOFs anyway. So, here's the skinny on parties, feel free to add any I don't know about in the comments section, below: Sunday As part of the...
Continuing our look at the improvements of the new JSF spec - see previous blogs here and here. While JSPs are widely used and understood, their use in JSF has always been controversial. But love it or hate it, it's always been true that JSPs never quite fit in with JSF, and there were always some rough edges around where the two technologies fit together. All that's changed with JSF 2, since...
Continuing our look at JSF (see previous blog here), one of the biggest complaints about JSF is the Lifecycle. And it's not hard to understand why - here you are, just about to write a Hello World application, and the folks who wrote the documentation hit you with something that looks like this: Wow. Looks complicated. But really, for many tasks, you don't need to know most of this, and that'...
One of the most persistent annoyances in working on JSF is the pervasiveness of old information, usually from years ago, and often now inaccurate. Google ranks the JSF 1.1 tutorial over the JSF 1.2 tutorial... One Tweet I recently read referred to a Joe Ottinger blog from 2007 - over 2 years ago. Yet it was referenced as new information. Still another blog I recently read contained...
It's been a long time, but I've revisited the Switchlist component I blogged about here here and here. Read through those old entries to see where we are with things. I will assume you're already familiar with the content of those entries, we've got a lot to cover as it is. Today, we're going to completely rework this code, to illustrate some best practices. We'll make the component use Ajax...
The Mojarra team are proud to announce the release of our Beta version of Mojarra 2.0, implementing the PFD version of the JavaServer Faces 2.0 spec. You can find it on our downloads page, as well as in the GlassFish Update Center. And as always, be sure to check the release notes for more information.
As I mentioned in my previous blog, the guys over at IntelliJ are working hard on getting Java EE 6 support in, including JSF 2. It's now available as part of an Early Access Program, and is available for download. As a very early release, so expect bugs - but this is still exciting news.
So, you're on the cutting edge, writing JSF 2.0 applications, but you just get tired of jkl; editing in vi... You can still do JSF 2.0 applications using your IDE, but the price is that you won't have some of the on the fly error checking (especially in your Facelets page). First, a little about the status of various support efforts - unfortunately, tools support will lag for JSF 2.0, just as...
Today I want to look at how to handle Ajax events and errors in JSF 2. JSF 2's Ajax support includes a very basic facility to listen for events and errors within JSF's client side processing code. It's envisioned that this will primarily be used by component developers that wish to monitor events - for instance, turning an image yellow when there's an outstanding Ajax request, and black when...
Somewhat recently, I had a user of JSF 2.0 ask how to do a redirect from a JSF 2.0 Ajax request. Here's one way, that I've lifted from one of our tests: First, the bean that does the work: <pre>@ManagedBean@RequestScopedpublic class RedirectBean {&nbsp; &nbsp; public String redirect() {&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; FacesContext ctx = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance...