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Blog Archive for driscoll during November 2008

You've seen this component before: two lists, with buttons that let you move options from one list to the other. Here's what it looks like: Now, we'll be looking at this for the next few blog posting, so I'm going to ask you to bear with me - this blog will just introduce the context for this component - I won't be showing any neat new JSF 2.0 features - that will happen over the next few...
I was sitting in at a talk on Ajax components the other day, and they mentioned the Flickr style editable text. For those who've never experienced the Ajax joy that is Flickr, it's a web based photography site. When viewing your own pictures, text such as the titles of your photos appears just as plain text, just as it does for other people's photos. The difference is that when you hover the...
In my previous blog postings, I talked about making the Spinner component, and then added styles via an external css file. Please review those first, if you haven't looked at them yet. This time, we'll move the JavaScript out to a separate file, and make sure that we can execute multiple spinners in a page, like this: <pre>          ...
In my last blog, I wrote a simple spinner component. In this posting, I'll add styling to it using the outputStylesheet tag, and a separate css file. The <h:outputStylesheet/> tag is a way to output a cached stylesheet instance to a JSF page - just use it with a "name" attribute, where the name is the name of a css file in the resources directory of your web app. Since this is the same...
In a previous posting, I described the basic structure of a JSF 2.0 composite component. Here's a slightly more complex example of writing a component using JSF 2.0's Composite Component feature. The Spinner component takes only 30 lines to create the classic "entry field with buttons" spinner as a component you can use in any JSF page. First a description of what a "Spinner" is, in case you'...
In my previous blog post, I talked about the New Composite Component feature of JSF. I'll come back to that shortly, but I'd like to talk about another new feature: integrated Ajax support. While this part of the specification is still being finalized, I thought it might be worthwhile to see what a simple example of the Ajax support in JSF 2.0 will look like. (Don't worry, I'll tie this...
One of the pain points for JSF has always been the complexity that you face in creating components. In JSF 2.0, creating a new component that's made up of existing components is a snap. Here's a quick example of how you can create a new component, and use it in your page. For this example, I wanted to create a simple text box that has a yellow background. Useful? No. Simple? Yes :-) In...