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Blog Archive for daniel during April 2005

J2SE in the embedded space Ted Kosan applauds One Small Change for a Page, One Giant Leap for J2SE in today's Weblogs . " While much of the Java community has been busy battling in the J2EE/.NET wars, the Law of Accelerating Returns has been relentlessly pushing microelectronics into the microcosm. All of a sudden, J2SE 5.0-capable embedded systems about the size of a dollar bill are...
JCP News from Brazil Simon Phipps reports "The agency responsible for that tax filing system, SERPRO, has applied to join the JCP. That makes the Brazilian government the first in the world to join the JCP in such a significant way. There was a high-profile announcement of this at Café Brasil, featuring Onno Kluyt for the JCP." In today's Weblogs , Phipps writes Brazil - the...
Building classes out of air Elisabeth and Eric Freeman have thought a bit more about the Factory design pattern. The Factory family enables you to create concrete instances of classes of a particular type at runtime. In reviewing their book "Head First Design Patterns", Erich Gamma made suggested they could remove a dependency on concrete classes in the implementation the Freeman's...
Does Java on the Desktop Matter? Bill Bumgarner has written a blog titled Why Java on the Desktop Just Doesn't Matter. Before you click on the story (I hope it's not too late), I want to provide a bit of context for Bill - he's one of the good guys. As you can see in this post on the origin of the magic number oxCAFEBABE he's been a "Java user since the day Sun released the original JDK...
Turning off Trackbacks We've spent the last few months fighting Trackback spam. Each day, particularly on Fridays towards the end of the day, we get a barrage of trackbacks attached to our blogs and articles. For the most part these have come from online poker sites but from time to time a porn site posts as well. Spam in my own inbox is one thing, but this spam clogs up other people'...
The problems with making things too simple. I spent the weekend hacking up some C code. I'd forgotten so much it wasn't funny. Some of it was easily fixed by thumbing through K and R. (By the way, what's the Java equivalent of K and R?) I'm so used to coding in two steps: get it right and then make it pretty. Refactoring felt awkward in C. And who do these methods belong to? Wait - they aren'...
"Dead trees, digitally delivered" Check out this combination of a cool idea with a clever implementation. The tools we use for creating content need not always be the same as he tools we use for deploying that content. Sometimes you'd like to just jot down your notes on paper using a simple pen or pencil. These notes can include sketches, links, mind maps, plain text - even an XML button....
When your coffee grinder talks to the brewer When I used to give talks on distributed programming I would get knowing smiles from the audience when I recalled the dark side of the Jini dream of having all of your devices talking to each other. Your coffee machine would refuse to make you coffee because it knows that you like milk in your coffee and it has checked with your refrigerator...
Weighting results with the Dempster-Schaffer algorithm The new project dempster-schaffer is a Java implementation of an algorithm that "allows us to allocate probability-like weights to a set of events in a way that allows statements of ignorance about likelihood of some of the events. From the allocation of weights we get two numbers; the degree to which an event is supported by the...
Flow control when developing Exceptions are all about figuring out what happened when your program is not executing as expected. Tom Ball talks about the benefits of using exceptions when debugging in his post Exceptional Debugging in today's Weblogs . For him, "The justification for exception breakpoints was simple: exceptions (should) indicate abnormal control flow in a...