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Blog Archive for daniel during September 2004

J2SE 5.0 available. Although there have been fairly stable beta versions available for months, it's nice to have the final version of the Java Tiger release downloaded and installed. If you are just getting acquainted with Tiger, take a look at our excerpt from the book "Java 1.5 Tiger: A Developer's Notebook". Brett McLaughlin and David Flanagan have written an "all...
Tiger is coming to a desktop near you. Developers have seen lists of changes to the language for the Tiger release for months. Generics, varargs, static imports, enums, ... lots of new toys for us to play with. In today's Weblogs, Chet Haase writes about the features that the end users will notice in Tiger on the Desktop. It is one impressive list - don't miss the item that shows you how...
java.net moves to Movable Type John Reynold's leads off today's Weblogs with a post about the open letter from Sun regarding Java persistence. In Someone's listening, he links to Sun's letter supporting the creation of a "common persistence API underlying JDO and EJB." Meanwhile, Joshua Marinacci continues his exploration of the concept of mini-apps with his latest "...
Join the chat tomorrow with java.net on Java Live The city is working on the water main for our street. We have a small red hose running water to our house from a 4 inch temporary pipe that runs down the street for the length of the block. At the end of the block it branches to a two inch pipe that crosses the street and runs up the other side of the street. You can see a red hose branch of...
Is Computer Science fading to Computer Fashion The debate returns on whether or not Java is cool or not. In today's Weblogs, Brett McLaughlin complains that "there's just something sort of boring about the Java space right now. Don't get me wrong--it's still my language of choice. It's still what I go for when I need something done, and I still have something like 3 or 4...
What word did you mean to use? Remember when spell checkers first started appearing in consumer applications. We all had a lot of fun with the wacky suggestions that we would get. You would leave out the space in "a business" and the suggestion would come up "Did you mean 'abysmal'." How would you implement a spell checker? How would you create lists of words that the author may have meant...
Refactoring can take you where you need to go. You are coding along and notice that you have a fairly lengthy case statement that you have used more than once. It occurs to you that the State pattern might be a better approach and so you start to refactor your code. In today's Weblogs, Vincent Brabant praises Joshua Kerievski's book Refactoring to Patterns as "The best book I readed...
A cool jar-file hack In today's Weblogs, Laird Nelson offers up a Cheap Hack I: rename your jar file, get a different Main-Class. The hack is very cool - I love these kind of blog entries. He "put together a class that itself is installed as the Main-Class in a jar file, but which consults a file (also in the jar) to let it know what class to actually use as the main...
Our java.net poll asks the continent on which you code We run a new poll each Friday. The latest asks On which continent do you mainly write code. Even a simple question like that is difficult to phrase correctly. We wanted to know a bit about where coders are. But we couldn't ask where are you from as people are often not coding in the country that they consider to be their nationality. Then...
What's your Meyers-Briggs classification In today's Weblogs, Craig Castelaz reports that "nearly every conversation I've ever had about extreme programming eventually works its way to pair programming, which pretty much kills the dialog part of the conversation." I think he's dead right about this. I've always argued that pair programming is orthogonal to the...