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Blog Archive for daniel during May 2004

It would be nice to build one, throw it away, and start over. Do you ever throw it away? In today's Forums, John Mitchell asks "Have you written a first version with the intention of throwing it away and then actually threw it away? How do you deal with cases where the prototype was not thrown away? Do you do anything different in the development of a prototype when you're pretty sure that it...
When you redeploy your J2EE apps, how do you handle active users? In today's Weblogs, Srikanth Shenoy makes an analogy to entering a store with a welcoming sign that says "OPEN". You are then suddenly ejected from the store without explanation and now look at the sign and it reads "CLOSED". Shenoy calls this the Retail Outlet Pattern and suggests how to avoid this in your J2EE application....
The next bookclub discussion begins on May 26. We're running an excerpt from Howard M. Lewis Ship's book Tapestry in Action. Like other frameworks, Tapestry promises to ease your development experience. In "Getting started with Tapestry," Ship says that Tapestry "enables you to implement more complicated behaviors in much less time and be more confident that your code is bug free. Tapestry can...
But what if you like the tedious repetitive tasks? It may have been a coincidence, but I think we stopped having vendors at our local JUG around the time that the fourth one in four months told us that we could use their tool to program without writing any code. The last one showed us that we could draw a UML that seemed to only have a few boxes in it and hundreds of class files would be...
"Most real innovation is done by crazy people doing crazy things." James Gosling explains the keys to innovation in The world needs more crazy people in today's Weblogs. A Wired article on NASA's funding of "crazy" projects has moved him to note that this is the "kind of over-the-edge thinking that bring about the most interesting innovation. Gosling doesn't advocate running full speed blind...
Last week at TheServerSide Java Symposium, spec lead Linda DeMichiel unveiled the current state of EJB 3.0. The effect was immediate. Rod Johnson kept shaking his head during his presentation "J2EE without EJB" saying "I thought this slide would be controversial." He had updated his slides to incorporate the changes that DeMichiel had detailed for EJB 3.0. Although he liked many of the changes...
How useful are certification exams as a measure of whether or not a candidate is qualified? In Forums today, tackline posts about Java Certification saying "SCJP/SCJD only tells you that someone isn't a total moron. Absence of evidence isn't evidence of absence. If you want to sort the good from the vaguely-know-what's-going-on, Sun's certification wont help you. If you filter CVs on the basis...
Maybe the job market has turned around if the interviewees are beginning to ask tougher questions. When you interview for a job do you say "I'm making an investment in their company by joining it, just as they are making an investment in me by hiring me." When times are tough we sometimes forget this or don't have the luxury of living it. In Forums today, vlenin posts that in his tech...
The JDO 2.0 JSR has been approved despite no votes from BEA, Oracle, and IBM. It is interesting to read some of the comments offered in support of votes for and against this JSR that describes an extension to the JDO specification. It is reminiscent of what Jim Waldo calls the Highlander principle. Although he was referring to a different technology dispute, Waldo said that like in the movie...
"Whether or not you like dynamic languages, you better warm up to 'em because they're not going away any time soon." Tim Bray writes "right now I'm 100% take-it-to-the-bank bet-my-career sure of this: dynamic languages (what we used to call 'scripting languages') are already playing a large role in Enterprise Software Development; and their role is going to be growing in size, at least for...