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Blog Archive for daniel during March 2004

Kathy Sierra blogs about why Pair Programming is not always a choice. As is often the case with Kathy's writing, she headed in a completely different direction than I had expected. For me pair programming is often not an option because I work at home most of the time, up on the third floor connected to the rest of the world with DSL, a telephone, and a clock radio. When I write code, I follow...
Dynamic typing or Strong Typing - choose one. Collective code ownership or a single owner of a class - discuss. You've seen the scene many times in court room dramas. The prosecuting attorney sneers at the witness and asks an ambiguous question and insists the witness answer yes or no. The audience knows that without qualification neither answer is quite correct and yet we do the same thing in...
There's a piece of software you really like, why not buy licenses for a friend or two? Sure, there are lots of things wrong with that idea, but before you dismiss it, take a look at Daniel Brookshier's Peer-to-Peer, JXTA, and Making a Lot of Money with Viral Marketing in java.net's Also in Java Today. You may think "what a waste of money, what if they don't like and don't use the software...
The elevator kept stopping at the wrong floor. It was a combination of the UI and the user. I was confronted with a UI issue yesterday and was relieved to find out I wasn't the only one stumped by it. I got on an elevator and pressed what I thought was the button for the ninth floor. To my surprise the elevator stopped at the eighth floor. I looked down and realized that the buttons in this...
What if Jini was part of J2SE? Apple's iPhoto was a nice application for organizing and viewing your digital images. It is a nice stand-alone desktop application. But many computers are connected to the network. What if there are people on your network who also have iPhoto and you would like to share pictures with them? Apple's Rendezvous made it pretty easy for photo sharing to be added to...
Ken Arnold keynotes on five years of the Jini community. The seventh Jini community meeting began yesterday in Cambridge, MA with Ken Arnold's thoughts on five years of the Jini community. He outlined some basic principles that are worth applying in many situations. The first is that results matter. Implementations may vary but as long as the right thing happens, how it happens doesn't matter...
Bill Coleman addresses the SDForum on the next big thing. Last Thursday's SDForum's Distinguished Speaker Series featured Cassat corp's CEO Bill Coleman. In The Next Big Thing you can see a summary of the address. Coleman advises that you need to concentrate not just on technology but on "the innovation to apply technology to increase productivity and bring value." How much value? Enough that...
Does the advice your mom used to give you about dating apply to producing software? In Also in Java Today, Kathy Sierra blogs that the answer is yes in in How are you on a blind date? For example the dating advice on presenting a good first impression by wearing a good (and clean) shirt translates to "If your code, API, interface gives users a first impression that you didn't take the...
Chris Adamson continues his series on the Java APIs for OpenGL. In the featured article Juggling JOGL, Chris "introduces the concepts in JOGL, the Java bindings to OpenGL, that are applicable to 2D gaming. We start with the handling of coordinate spaces and how they're scaled from the OpenGL world to the screen. Then we integrated JOGL's built-in Animator class to provide motion to our...
The winners of the 14th annual JOLT awards were announced last night in Santa Clara at SDWest. My favorite two entries, java.net and Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates' "Head First Java" were finalists but didn't win. There were many cool and impressive finalists this year and the awards were a lot of fun, but I continue to think that Head First Java can be misunderstood by many. If you don't read it...