Skip to main content

Blog Archive for daniel during December 2003

Dear [reader.name], we hope you will enjoy the article published [content.date] by [content.author] called [content.title] about [content.summary]. Not exactly the personal approach we give you here at java.net, but a mail merge is just one of the obvious applications of a templating engine. Erik Hatcher explains that " A template engine processes a template and fills in the parameterized...
Ward Cunningham writes "As of December, 2003, I've taken a position at Microsoft with the title Architect." Hmmm. I have a semi-reliable memory of an exchange that followed Doc Searls' ApacheCon keynote address. Someone asked Doc how do we help big companies understand the value and culture of open source software. Doc answered, "you go work for them." And now Ward has gone to work for them...
For many, the end of the year means vacations: hanging out at home with your family, traveling, relaxing, or finally having time to work on your favorite open source project. One of the advantages of being a fictional character is that Duke can be on vacation in many places at once. Unpack your stuffed Duke toy and snap (tasteful) holiday pictures of Duke on vacation. In Holiday Pictures we...
Check out the events listing at the end of this daily blog. The host countries listed are France, the United States, Brazil, England, and Russia. The links also take you to pages written in the native language of the host country. It's a start. With millions of Java programmers world wide, I'm certain there are more events we could be listing. Whether you're hosting a local Java User Group...
"Traditions of computer science and software engineering have tried to turn all aspects of software creation into a pure engineering discipline, when they clearly are not. The MFA in software would begin to repair this error." In so many ways, Richard Gabriel's thesis makes a lot of sense. What if we trained computer scientists the same way we trained poets and artists. In Also in Java...
While Joshua Marinacci presents his ideas on making your Java desktop applications feel more like native applications, you can play along at home. Today in Projects and Communities, the Java Desktop community has added the Mad Chatter project. Ostensibly Mad Chatter is a shell of an IM application that is the companion application for the series that began with Make Your Swing App Go Native...
When you double-click an application, how do you know that it has been written in Java? Is it important that you know? In many cases, the way you know that your application isn't native is that something doesn't feel quite right. The buttons look funny or you see "Quit" where you expect "Exit" or the keyboard accelerators aren't what you expect. Today Joshua Marinacci kicks off a three part...
Imagine adding methods and variables to objects at runtime. Seems odd - how do other objects know what methods they can call. Seems scary. Seems kind of cool. We link to part two of Bill Venners interview with Matz, Ruby creator Yukihiro Matsumoto, in Also in Java Today. Matz provides an example of the use of dynamic features. One example is a proxy. Instead of designing individual proxy...
Yesterday Sun announced that they would not be joining the Eclipse project. At least not now. In the article Sun drops bid to join Eclipse, Martin Lamonica reports that after "several months of negotiations, Sun Microsystems has decided not to join the Eclipse open-source tools effort backed by rival IBM." In addition Sun "will no longer try to merge the Sun-sponsored NetBeans.org open-...
"No" answers Richard Monson-Haefel in his examination of IBM and BEA's decision to "propose three new JSRs (235, 236, and 237) based on specifications that they had already developed." In Weblogs , Richard points out that JSRs 235, 236, and 237 are very much in the spirit of the JCP. In IBM and BEA: Are they thumbing their noses at the JCP?, he writes that "the JCP is not supposed to stifle...