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Blog Archive for daniel during November 2003

We have a few articles coming up in the next few weeks on JSPs. It's a bit of a theme. JSPs are not the only topic of articles we will be publishing but they are a mini-feature. If you have ideas for future feature topics, drop us a line. Today's addition to the list is at the top of the Featured Articles section. Part one of Budi Kurniawan's Easy Custom Tags with Tag Files look at the new...
Last night we had high winds in the midwest. Our house lost a piece of gutter and my office window blew open scattering papers everywhere. I interpret entropy to mean that the wind could not possibly have left my room neater than it was. Entropy also argues in favor of refactoring. Sure there are arguments against refactoring and we pointed to them this summer when the debate heated up after...
Is the best documentation for code the code itself? In Gosling's recent work the code is seen as one of the ways to view a program. Bill Venners paraphrases Gosling as saying "if the notion of truth in a program is the abstract syntax tree, not text, you can display the program in a lot of interesting ways." The latest installment of Bill's interview with James Gosling is Visualizing Complexity...
"I believe in Swing. I really think it's the best toolkit for writing robust cross-platform applications. However, if we don't do something to jumpstart it's growth then it'll die along with the dinosaurs: big, powerful, and unable to keep up." That's how Joshua Marinacci begins his entry Swing has failed. What can we do? in the java.net Weblogs section. The article may begin as if it is a...
One of the reasons I like introducing young people to programming is there is a lack of ambiguity. In a programming class often the instructor and students are on the same side. The instructor is trying to help novices craft their code in such a way that the compiler can understand what they mean and so that the code meets the testable requirements. Most of us have been rushing through code and...
Sometimes a solution is so compelling that you immediately get it. You understand the problem space and the need for a solution and suddenly one appears that is appropriately simple. Therefore, BOOM! Ken Auer's essay Therefore, BOOM! is featured in the java.net Java Patterns in Projects and Communities today. By "BOOM!" Ken doesn't "mean it has to be startling, just an obvious release of...
"SOAP was originally an acronym for Simple Object Access Protocol. (Now it's just a name.)" So begins Richard Monson-Haefel's chapter on SOAP from his Addison-Wesley book "J2EE Web Services" that we feature today. We continue to discuss the pros and cons of including book excerpts at java.net. We aren't replacing original content with excerpts and we are in the process of increasing the number...
UML 2 is due to be released in the Spring. Martin Fowler blogs that the acronym may more accurately stand for the "Unwanted Modeling Language". In Projects and Communities , the java.net Java Tools points to Martin Fowler's article on disdain for UML. Earlier Fowler wrote that there are three modes of UML users Sketchers who use UML for sketching in two ways: forward sketching...
Separating business and presentation is a recurring theme. In a web application you want to give the users quick feedback if they enter invalid data but you do not want to burden the page designer with coding this logic in. In today's featured Weblogs , John Reynolds shares his Field Validation Thoughts. He begins with an example from work that includes code written in everything from COBOL...
Another year has come and gone and I still haven't been to the Colorado Software Summit. Last week's show conflicted with OOPSLA, The O'Reilly Mac OS X Con, and even Microsoft's PDC. In today's featured Weblogs , Bill Dudney reports back from Colorado in his blog entry Software Summit - What a Blast . In true blogging style, Bill's entry is filled with links to people and topics that he saw...