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Blog Archive for daniel during September 2003

One of the most enjoyable aspects of editing java.net is hearing suggestions from readers on how to improve our site. People who subscribed to the RSS feed asked us to link directly to stories instead of making them click on our front page and then clicking off site. People who didn't stop by each day or who didn't get around to reading the RSS feed for a couple of days...
A friend emailed that he had just seen the new java.net front page and wondered when we changed it. His daily interaction with java.net is through our RSS feed. This leads to wondering what might be the equivalent of an RSS newsreader that can be used to browse web services? In Also in Java Today we link to the latest in Adam Bosworth's series on creating a Web Service Browser. In an...
The shift to OO was supposed to, in part, place the functionality in the same place as the data it acted on. You would make requests of an object instead of operating directly on the data. Today in Projects and Communities, Frank Sommers points out in the latest java.net Jini Community newsletter, "Because many programs rely on access to persistently stored data, a large amount of...
Is documentation part of a class's spec? What belongs in the code and what belongs in the docs? In Also in Java Today Brian Goetz begins his developerWorks article on Characterizing thread safety by referring to the "Documenting Thread Safety" Item from Joshua Blochs "Effective Java Programming Language Guide" in which developers are entreated to document in prose exactly what thread...
The debate on handling exceptions and dealing with potential errors continues. You may remember this from James Gosling's July blog entry Flying at Mach 1 "If you want to build something really robust, you need to pay attention to things that can go wrong and most folks don't in the C world because it's just to damn hard." Bill Venners continues his series of interviews with James and the...
After you finish writing your Java desktop application and QA it and polish it up - how do you deploy it? In some ways that depends on your audience. If you are targeting fellow geeks then maybe a jar file or a directory with an Ant build.xml file is enough. In his Weblog entry Bandwidth, Installers and Schema Updates , Will Iverson responds to recent feedback an article generated - in...
RMI is part of the J2SE stack. As more power becomes available on "limited devices" you may find J2SE running on devices that were once targets for J2ME. In the meantime, there have been several ideas on how to bring RMI to a phone near you. JSR 66 resulted in the J2MI RMI Optional Package (RMI OP). You'll see that there are restrictions on the supported hardware that don't yet include...
The java.net bloggers are at it again. This time the topic is autoboxing and there's a twist - we only kind of know what we're talking about. As David Walend writes in his entry Defending Autoboxing (or Save Us From the Preprocessor), "I haven't read the spec yet -- Only JCP members have had the chance. I think we should reserve judgment at least until we can see what the JSR expert group has...
The Peer-to-Peer Sockets Project has a vision of "returning the end-to-end principle to the Internet. The vision includes a P2P DNS server known as DisDNS which their wiki page describes as "a distributed, secure, human-friendly Domain Name System." This idea isn't fully formed - join the discussion on their wiki page. The p2psockets project provides a layer on top of JXTA so that you can take...
When Ant was created there was a particular itch being scratched. The traditional make didn't seem to fit the requirements of a Java based project. Ant was a small utility that was quickly adopted by Java developers. Adopted and extended. Ant is no longer small. The zip of the latest build of the 1.6 binaries is 9.5M. The learning curve for understanding "Zen and the Ant of Project Maintenance"...