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Blog Archive for daniel during August 2003

Fifteen hours of no power means no computer, no tv, no cellphone, and no lights. It also means a couple of candles, a deck of cards, and the best view of stars we've had in Cleveland since the last blackout. This morning, as many of us compare notes, we feel refreshed and ready to go. Taking time to recharge your batteries shouldn't wait for the next forced break from our wired world. Sometimes...
Many recent weblog entries on java.net have highlighted different usability issues many of which could be resolved by presenting a powerful and easily navigated view to your clients. Today's feature article, Custom Layouts, by Doug Lyon shows you how to create your own Layout Manager. In Lyon's example you create your own grid layout where the maximum preferred size of components such as...
As a recovering academic, I think a lot about bridging the gulf between practitioners and teachers. If industry wants more students to be better prepared then we have to devote some time supporting those that teach our future colleagues. How should the teachers reach across the divide? At his lunch time address to educators, Joshua Kerievsky asked the group what they thought were important...
Look around at the tasks you perform every day. How did you learn them? When you are trying to lend credibility to an approach you took, do you walk through the code and show the advantages or do you quote a guru who recommends taking that approach. Sometimes knowing who recommends an approach is helpful. It provides context for the recommendation. In his keynote address yesterday at XP...
In the past week I've been much more aware when I use or hear the phrase "Can't you just ...". I never really connected my negative reaction in hearing it to the positive helpful intent I have when using it. Andy Lester's blog entry Can't you just ...?redux has helped clarify this for me. Andy also links to Piers Cawley's essay The Fine Art of Complexity Management. Cawley presents a wonderful...
Ten years ago today, forever seemed like a really long time. That was the day that I formally exchanged vows with Kimmy the wonderwife. Father Guido Sarducci used to say that the phrase "forever and ever" was overkill. He noted that the additional "and ever" probably isn't necessary - it's covered by "forever". And then we had kids and forever changed to not being long enough. There are less...
I'm a fan of XP. In many situations the principles and practices that underly XP make a lot of sense to me. I'm not offended when someone else doesn't like it or finds fault with it or decides it's not for them -- as long as their decision is an informed decision. Today we feature Matt Stephens article The Case Against Extreme Programming. He makes many points that I've heard before and he and I...
Threads can bite you in so many ways. N. Alex Rupp's java.net article Multithreaded Tests with JUnit looks at extending JUnit so that it can test multithreaded applications. One application of this extension is to enable you to stress test middleware components by simulating concurrent traffic. The featured Weblogs include Michael Nascimento Santos' invitation for you to participate in JSR-220...
If software is a craft, shouldn't pride in your work be a motivating factor? What does it take for you to feel responsible for your work and to do it to your utmost? Who else needs to know which particular part was yours for you to be motivated to produce the best results possible? In Extreme Programming (XP) there is a notion of no code ownership. The idea is that all production code is...
Today we debut the new java.net Event Calendar. Check the listings for upcoming interesting conferences, meetings, seminars, and social gatherings. Submit your Java events allowing us time to process and post them. The java.net button points to events where java.net will be exhibiting or presenting. Join us this week at LinuxWorld in San Francisco. Wednesday night stop by the Argent Hotel...