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Blog Archive for daniel during July 2003

You get a big fat requirements specification document. You know, the one big enough for a three year old to use as a booster seat. You couldn't possibly have read it all -- do you sign it? In Java Today we link to Stephen Taylor's discussion of this issue. In The Experience of Being Understood, Taylor says that in his experience, the business manager always signs to approve a document he...
Today we feature Danese Cooper's notes from the first java.net community meeting. The notes are presented as notes and not cleaned up for publication. At the first java.net community meeting, I talked about the dynamic nature of the content on Java Today saying something like "I'm the editor-in-chief of java.net and I don't know what's on our site today." Perhaps that's why I haven't been...
Getting started programming in Java can be a daunting task. Experienced programmers don't think twice about creating a GUI and adding a JButton. Ken Arnold suggests that you look at the JButton class with the eyes of a newbie. It is overwhelming. Scan the number of methods that are available to you from JButton directly and from the hierarchy from which it descends: AbstractButton, JComponent,...
It's not always easy to prove that two things are equivalent. There are the straightforward cases from high school geometry of those stupid proofs that two triangles are equivalent using SAS (Side angle side), ASA, or one of those other rules. But even in geometry equivalence can get more interesting. Consider these three statements. Given a line and a point not on that line, there is exactly...
At my first OOPSLA in Minneapolis I sat a couple of rows behind Jim Coplien at the Educators' Symposium. In one activity we had to gather in groups of four and decide on which eight (I think) features were most important in some setting. After a few minutes each group merged with another group, then two of these larger groups merged, and so on. The idea was that as the size of each group doubled...
Checking our logs, many people check in with java.net each day by checking this daily RSS feed. You can subscribe in your newsreader using the Orange and Grey box in the left nav of our front page. Users asked if we could provide direct links to the stories, blogs, and pages referenced in this "What's Happening in Java Today" feed. The short answer is, yes. Starting today we link directly to...
In his java.net weblog entry "A Client Side Container for J2EE", Maciej Zawadzki takes a first stab at arguing for a client side container. He argues that in " multi-tier enterprise level applications, whenever we can get rid of state that is a good thing. But I feel compelled to point out that making a service stateless is not the same thing as getting rid of caching." He looks briefly at...
It's still early days for java.net We went live a little under a month ago and still have a long way to go. We're still tagging this release as beta 0.1. We're working on content and infrastructure and would appreciate your feedback. The O'Reilly team will be meeting in Portland this week at OSCon , if you have feedback on how we can improve this site either drop me an email today or tomorrow...
My wife's email includes offers to lengthen appendages she doesn't have by 27%. The spam filter finds most of them, but she has to take the time to delete them and once in a while comes across a graphic picture of a squirrel or a topless woman. Spam, like telemarketers, is unwanted and inappropriate contact that most agree should be stopped. At Java Today we are puzzling over what to do about...
An optimizing compiler often give you choices that include optimizing for speed or optimizing for code size. Discussions of improving code can not be separated from your objectives. If you are burning your application to a space constrained chip then size may be most important. If you are creating a highly responsive application, then aparant speed may be most important. Before the compiler...