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Blog Archive for daniel during July 2003

Today in java.net we highlight a new project built to give "hard-core Javaphiles, new and old, that 'wow, I never knew that was possible!' feeling". The edgecase project is looking for developers and hoping to ramp up in the next week or two. Whether you have a great idea or just want to lurk, consider joining the project. Sometimes we don't try new things because we don't know they are...
Maybe this is the wrong group to ask, but how often have you used open source software and not messed with the code base? This is, of course, a non-representative sample of users of open source software. In his most recent java.net blog entry, Simon Phipps draws the distinction between people who need the source and people who just want to use the software. Simon's entry, Sun and Open Source...
You see a need for hole to be filled in a particular software offering or API. It's just so obvious. It wouldn't be that hard to do. You ask, "Why don't they just < fill your favorite pet peeve here>". Often the barrier to accomplishing your goal is not a technical issue. I've covered Java on the Mac for a variety of publications over the last seven years or so. It's a lot happier beat...
Imagine a high school or college student working late the night before a paper is due. The libraries are closed when the student starts to work on the Bibliography. What if the student's word processor could transparently use Amazon as a resource for creating a bibliography. The student types in the title, author, and publication year of the book and a correctly formatted entry is created with...
Briefly, yesterday, we quietly debuted a feature that allowed you to submit your Java related events for listing in java.net . Thanks to those that submitted events. We're still polishing how best to present this feature. If you have any ideas, please respond in the talkback below. Today's featured Weblog is Jack Shirazi's Java Case Studies. As Java has gotten more popular, it has also gotten...
Clay Shirkey recommends that when you are constructing social software to support large and long-lived groups, you need to build in barriers to participation. For some groups this is a binary switch - you are in or you aren't. For others, non-members can do certain tasks (like reading the content posted on java.net ), while members can post replies, and higher levels of membership can host...
Cory Doctorow looks at the SCO Linux strategy as a high-stakes version of the Prisoner's Dilemma. You can read more about this classic game at Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The key is summarized there as "whatever the other does, each is better off confessing than remaining silent. But the outcome obtained when both confess is worse for each than the outcome they would have obtained had...
The GridBagLayout is kind of the brocoli of the Swing layout managers. It's good for you, there are people who seem to really like it, but it's brocoli. In Java Today we feature a java.net project named packer. In many ways the new approach isn't much more accessible to new users but the code that a complex layout would require is greatly reduced. Greg offers the following example of using...
The java.net top weblog introduces a new feature: our Poetry Corner. The first contribution is from Tom Clements. Tom's work as a Java poet was featured several years ago in the JavaOne conference coverage produced by JavaWorld magazine. We've got work by other poets on tap. Feel free to send your own to Poetry Corner as long as they focus on technology and don't contain references to that...
The new Java logo was unveiled at this year's JavaOne conference. There was so much secrecy around the logo that, even though O'Reilly edits the content for java.net and the new logo sits at the top of every page, we weren't allowed to see it until the day of the launch. Never mind that one of our bloggers walked down to Moscone four days early and snapped a picture of the new logo and emailed...