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Blog Archive for arungupta during August 2009

TOTD #97 showed how to install GlassFish Tools Bundle for Eclipse 1.1. Basically there are two options - either install Eclipse 3.4.2 with WTP and pre-bundled/configured with GlassFish v2/v3, MySQL JDBC driver and other features. Or if you are using Eclipse 3.5, then you can install the plug-in separately and get most of the functionality. TOTD #98 showed how to create a simple Metro/JAX-WS...
Now that you've installed GlassFish Tools Bundle for Eclipse 1.1, lets use this bundle to create a simple Metro/JAX-WS compliant Web service and deploy on GlassFish. These steps will work with either Eclipse 3.4.2 or 3.5 with WTP Java EE support. Lets create a simple "Dynamic Web Project" as shown below: Name the project "HelloMetro" and take all other defaults: Click on "Finish" to...
A new version of GlassFish Tools Bundle for Eclipse (ver 1.1) was recently released. The build contains Eclipse 3.4.2 IDE with WTP Java EE support GlassFish v2.1 pre-registered and configured GlassFish v3 Prelude pre-registered and configured JavaDB sample database pre-registered and configured GlassFish Plugin (1.0.29) MySQL JDBC driver registered to the IDE Maven m2 plugins JAX-WS Metro...
GlassFish Monitoring allows you to monitor the state of various runtime components of the application server. This information is used to identify performance bottlenecks and tuning the system for optimal performance, to aid capacity planning, to predict failures, to do root cause analysis in case of failures and sometimes to just ensure that everything is functioning as expected. GlassFish...
Java Persistence API defines a standard object/relational mapping using POJOs. In JPA, a persistence unit is described using "persistence.xml", bundled with the web application, injected into your web application and then POJOs are used to access all the information from the underlying persistence mechanism such as a database. JPA can injected into your application couple of different ways as...
TOTD #93 showed how to get started with Java EE 6 using NetBeans 6.8 M1 and GlassFish v3 by building a simple Servlet 3.0 + JPA 2.0 web application. TOTD #94 built upon it by using Java Server Faces 2 instead of Servlet 3.0 for displaying the results. However we are still using a POJO for all the database interactions. This works fine if we are only reading values from the database but that's...
TOTD #93 showed how to get started with Java EE 6 using NetBeans 6.8 M1 and GlassFish v3 by building a simple Servlet 3.0 + JPA 2.0 web application. JPA 2.0 + Eclipselink was used for the database connectivity and Servlet 3.0 was used for displaying the results to the user. The sample demonstrated how the two technologies can be mixed to create a simple web application. But Servlets are meant...
NetBeans 6.8 M1 introduces support for creating Java EE 6 applications ... cool! This Tip Of The Day (TOTD) shows how to create a simple web application using JPA 2.0 and Servlet 3.0 and deploy on GlassFish v3 latest promoted build (58 as of this writing). If you can work with the one week older build then NetBeans 6.8 M1 comes pre-bundled with 57. The example below should work fine on that as...
The GlassFish High Availability allows to setup a cluster of GlassFish instances and achieve highly scalable architecture using in-memory session state replication. This cluster can be very easily created and tested using the "clusterjsp" sample bundled with GlassFish. Here are some clustering related entries published on this blog so far: TOTD #84 shows how to setup Apache + mod_proxy balancer...
"Extensibility" is a major theme of Java EE 6. This theme enables seamless pluggability of other popular Web frameworks with Java EE 6. Before Java EE 6, these frameworks have to rely upon registering servlet listeners/filters in "web.xml" or some other similar mechanism to register the framework with the Web container. Thus your application and framework deployment descriptors are mixed...