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Blog Archive for arungupta during February 2007

In the second part of the screen cast series (part 1), I show the various ways by which NetBeans IDE can invoke a Web service endpoint. The first part showed only the default way to invoke the endpoint, but this screen cast shows two additional ways. Enjoy it here. Feel free to post suggestions on what would you like to see in terms of Web services development using NetBeans. Technorati: Web...
As a follow up from a previous blog, the Web Services plugin in IntelliJIDEA now supports GlassFish v2. Here are the steps I followed to deploy the Web service on GlassFish: I updated the plugin version from "0.6 build 2" to "0.7 build 1" as shown here. Using Project Settings (default shortcut Ctrl+Alt+S), configure GlassFish in the Web Services plugin as shown...
One of the key advantages of JAX-WS Reference Implementation ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5]) is it's extensible nature. Several extensibility hooks, defined as abstract classes, are enabled through out the JAX-WS RI that allow to extend the core JAX-WS functionality for WSDL/Service Endpoint Interface processing. This document explains these hooks and their intended purpose.  An implementation of...
Today, I'm starting a series of screen casts that will show how NetBeans IDE provide first class interoperable Web services development experience using WSIT in GlassFish v2. The first episode in this series shows how a simple Web service can be developed, deployed and invoked using JAX-WS in GlassFish.  Enjoy it here. Feel free to post suggestions on what would you like to see in terms of...
In this third and last part of a blog series (part 1 and part 2), I plan to explore the steps to develop/deploy/invoke a Web service on GlassFish using Eclipse IDE. Eclipse does not offer GlassFish as a a bundled container. Instead you need to install GlassFish plugin for Eclipse explicitly. The plugin requires WTP 1.0 installed in Eclipse so I did that following the instructions. After...
Thanks to Robin Wilton for the link. Read more about how Sun and Microsoft achieved product-level interoperability between GlassFish and Windows Vista. A quote from the article ... "as these two teams worked together to bring about some calm in the turbulent seas of Web services, they found that engineering knows no prejudice. The result, three years later, is Sun’s Web Services...
One of the big benefits of JAX-WS 2.0 is that deployment descriptors are optional. By optional, it means no deployment descriptors are required if you can live with the reasonable defaults defined by the JAX-WS specification. So if you develop a trivial Web service, starting from POJO (Plain Old Java Object), as: @javax.jws.WebService(targetNamespace=&quot;http://example.org&quot;)<br...
As I mentioned in my previous post, here are the steps to develop/deploy/invoke a Web service using the Web Services plugin in IntelliJ IDEA. Thanks to AdvancedTools, author of the plugin, for helping me through this process. The Web service plugin bundles Axis 1.4 and supports JWSDP 2.0 ( contains JAX-WS 2.0 EA1 which is now final in Java 6), Axis 2, and XFire through pluggability. If you are...