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Blog Archive for arnold during June 2005

I've been waiting all conference to see something that can be exciting about the future of Java itself, not just for individual subparts of the Java community. So now I've found something. Apache is starting a serious project to create an open source implementation of the Java VM. Folks have tried this occasionally, but it usually dies quickly because it's a mess o' work, and only gets to be...
A clue for the folks who run this conference: When I run into someone I've met at last year's JavaOne, what's the first thing I want from the conference badge? Let me give you a hint: it isn't to see whether they have the same X-Ray of a cell phone that every other attendee has. This may come as a surprise, but trust me on this. I want to know their freakin' name. I'm particularly bad at...
On behalf of a friend: When you leave a BOF early, can you please close the door quietly? It seems basic courtesy to those left behind. As a counter-courtesy, maybe speakers at BOFs where there is no amplification could repeat questions? Next: Which fork do you use to skewer an ignorant speaker?
I don't know how to ease into this gently. So I'll just spit it out. Generics are a mistake. This is not a problem based on technical disagreements. It's a fundamental language design problem. Any feature added to any system has to pass a basic test: If it adds complexity, is the benefit worth the cost? The more obscure or minor the benefit, the less complexity its worth. Sometimes this is...
So we begin again. Another JavaOne. The place has certainly calmed down. Which is to be expected. The first JavaOne was at the rush of the .com boom. Everything was new, everyone was doing business with everyone else, new ideas, new possibilities. Every corner hid a new frisson. You felt you could just live off the vibes. By now it's much more staid. After all, Java isn't this amazing...
I'm working on the 4th edition of The Java Programming Language, and everyone of course has heard of the major new features. One of the odd little corners, though, is that Unicode has now grown beyond a 16 bit character standard, and so has lots of interesting new complications. Trivially, every method in the Character class that asks about a char now has an overload to which you can pass an...